Spring at Long Point, Ontario. Part 2 – Thrushes and Sparrows

A post detailing some of the comparatively subtle north American passerines that we encountered at Long point.

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Graham talked about the north American avifauna providing these birds to perfectly compliment the bright and gaudy warblers, and he’s right with THE THRUSHES in particular; Their appearance, tentative movements and the dappled light you often see them in go perfectly together, add something like Wood thrush song to the equation makes such a good birding experience. In fact the whole suite of Catharus thrushes are definitely something I focused on and enjoyed, and managed to see 5 species thereof. Swainson’s and Veerys were the most common throughout the 10 days, with Hermits in better numbers towards the beginning and only one Grey-cheeked briefly towards the end.  Wood thrush were consistently present in small numbers throughout our time there.

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Swainson’s thrushes

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Veerys

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Hermit thrushes

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Wood thrushes

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Gray-cheeked thrush

THE SPARROWS were something I’d lazily neglected to really study up on before hand but a very enjoyable group of birds with fluxes in numbers throughout the trip but often high numbers of Whitethroated, Chipping and Whitecrowned present. We also Saw Swamp, Field, Lincolns, Song and Savannah fairly regularly around Long point itself and both Grasshopper and Vesper Sparrows at a local farm nearby.

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White Throated Sparrow

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White crowned Sparrow

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Chipping Sparrow

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Lincolns Sparrow

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Savannah Sparrow

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Field Sparrow

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Song Sparrow

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Grasshopper sparrow

 

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